Quite the Panorama: The Kelseys' "Pollyanna" is a joy-inducing song and video about overcoming sadness

MUSIC PREVIEW INTERVIEW

The Kelseys' Pollyanna

The opening lyrics of The Kelseys' "Pollyanna" make it sound like it's going be a song about the devastation of depression:

Underneath all of the smiles 
Lies an emptiness that eats her alive 
Masked by all the joy and the laughter 
Is a voice screaming, "I'm not alright!" 

But by the time the band hits the pre-chorus and chorus, the soaring song shifts into an anthem for overcoming:

She puts her hand around me 
Well, maybe we should go 
Girl, raise your voice up high 
Run run run 
Till we're all out of breath 
from the 
Sun sun sun 
Beating down on our neck 
So 
Look at the horizon 
Quite the panorama 
Don't you ever worry 
Miss Pollyanna 

"'Pollyanna' is kind of a mixed story influenced by multiple people in my life," said singer-guitarist Peter Kwitny. "So many people struggle with things on the inside and put on brave faces to hide what they are really feeling, and I wanted it to be a song that people could relate to on a deep level."

Named after the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, the Ann Arbor quartet is made up of U-M students Kwitny, drummer Josh Cukier, guitarist Evan Dennis, and bassist Liam O'Toole. (The band plays a free concert at Lo-Fi in Ann Arbor on Thursday, March 28.)

"Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City" documents the artistry and symbolism during the city's golden age

VISUAL ART WRITTEN WORD PREVIEW

Guardians of Detroit

A collection of guardian faces from various Detroit buildings.

Due to a fortunate confluence of water, geography and entrepreneurial vision, Detroit at the end of the 19th century was poised to experience unprecedented growth. Even before the Ford Motor Company was established in 1903, Detroit was a major industrial center and transportation hub. All this commercial activity and prosperity led to a building boom of incredible proportions at a time when the most popular architectural styles were Beaux Arts, Gothic Revival, Classical Revival, and Art Deco. Each of these styles typically required extensive ornamentation and because of this, Detroit became a treasure trove of architectural sculpture. 

Jeff Morrison’s new book for Wayne State University PressGuardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City, documents these incredible features in a city that began as a small frontier fort and quickly grew to become a major metropolis and industrial titan. Morrison will be at Ann Arbor District Library's downtown location on Wednesday, March 27, at 7 pm for a presentation where he'll share more than 100 spectacular close-up pictures of architectural sculpture from throughout the city of Detroit. You will also learn about the symbolism behind the ornamentation and hear some of the untold stories of the artists, artisans, and architects involved in its creation, all drawn from the book. 

Below is a sneak peek of 10 photos from Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City:

Jam on It: Chirp celebrates the release of its debut studio album at The Blind Pig

MUSIC PREVIEW INTERVIEW

Chirp

When Pulp contributor Nicco Pandolfi spoke to the rising jam band Chirp in December 2017, singer-guitarist Jay Frydenlund said the Ann Arbor quartet was recording a studio album that would come out in 2018. 

Fast forward to March 2019 and that self-titled album has finally materialized, and Chirp will celebrate its release on Saturday, March 23 at The Blind Pig. 

Check out the video for "Greener," the first single from Chirp's new studio record, and listen to the live album the band put out in 2018, recorded June 30 at the Ann Arbor Summer Festival. Also, you can read an interview about the studio album's making over on the This Is a Good Sound blog.

Kind of Blue LLama: Norwegian trumpeter Mathias Eick opens Ann Arbor's new jazz club

MUSIC PREVIEW INTERVIEW

Mathias Eick and his album Ravensburg

When musicians write compositions, often they aren't able to hear a fully fleshed-out arrangement until it gets in the hands of their bands.

Norwegian jazz star Mathias Eick plays trumpet, vibraphone, double bass, guitar, piano -- and he sings. This means Eick gets to arrange and hear nearly every part of his gorgeous, evocative, kind-of-blue songs before he brings them to his band.

"I usually make full demos of the music playing all instruments, and I then have a wide understanding of what’s going on with the other guys once we start playing the new compositions," Eick said. "I've always thought that's an advantage."

Eick may play something other than trumpet, his primary instrument, when he becomes the first artist to perform at Blue LLama Jazz Club, a brand new music space in downtown Ann Arbor. But he'll likely leave the other instruments to his ace band: Nikolai Eilertsen (bass), Håkon Aase (violin), Erlend Slettvoll (piano), and Torstein Lofthus (drums).

Aase and Lofthus appear on the trumpeter's latest album, Ravensburg, his fourth for the legendary ECM Records, which has forever specialized in the sort of cool, colorific music at which Eick excels.

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Take a Ride on These Trailers

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

57th Ann Arbor Film Fest preview

A photo of the Michigan Theater from the first Ann Arbor Film Festival in 1963. Repository: Bentley Historical Library.

When I'm interested in a new film, the first thing I do is watch the trailer. I don't read about the trailer. I rarely even read about the film. I just want to see for myself what's being offered and make a decision based on what I've viewed.

When the 57th annual Ann Arbor Film Festival announced its 2019 lineup, I immediately began digging up trailers for the hundreds of short films and features chose from more than 3,000 submissions from more than 65 countries. As the oldest avant-garde and experimental film festival in North America, the Ann Arbor Film Festival has been screening the best of cutting-edge cinema since 1963, and my survey of the trailers for this year's fest was no exception. From bright computer animations to grainy 16 mm shorts, the  57th Ann Arbor Film Festival is ready to wow once again.

The festival runs March 26-31, and below are links to each day's programming with as many trailers embedded that I could find. I'll also be updating the press section so you can keep up on the many words that the media will surely spill on this Ann Arbor institution.

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Trailers for Tuesday, March 26 screenings

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

Still from Melissa Airy's The Stories Within

Still from Melissa Airy's The Stories Within.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 TRAILERS & EVENT LISTINGS
OPENING NIGHT:

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Trailers for Wednesday, March 27 screenings

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

Still from the Last Days of Chinatown

Still from the Last Days of Chinatown.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27 TRAILERS & EVENT LISTINGS:

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Trailers for Thursday, March 28 screenings

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

Still from the documentary Meow Wolf: Origin Story

Still from the documentary Meow Wolf: Origin Story.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 TRAILERS & EVENT LISTINGS:

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Trailers for Friday, March 29 screenings

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

Still from the film STREAM by Jan Brugger

Still from the film Under Covers by Michaela Olsen.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29 TRAILERS & EVENT LISTINGS:

57th Ann Arbor Film Festival: Trailers for Saturday, March 30 screenings

FILM & VIDEO PREVIEW

Still from Mirai Mizue's Dreamland animation

Still from Mirai Mizue's Dreamland animation.

SATURDAY, MARCH 30 TRAILERS & EVENT LISTINGS: